Tennis Love, Lousy Labels, and the Long Run

Tennis takes off, label claims need caution, and running into ripe old age.

tennis balls

Credit: szlea

It’s a Hit

Now that it’s spring, it’s time to take it outside. Maybe you’re ready to take your treadmill runs to the street. Or maybe you’re going to head to the neighborhood park to play some tennis. If you do the latter, chances are you won’t be alone. According to a recent report, tennis is the fastest growing sport in America among traditional sports—with an increase in participation of 43 percent since 2000. It’s easy to see why tennis is so great—it helps with aerobic fitness, upper- and lower-body strength, coordination and agility, among many other benefits. Now with tennis welcome centers encouraging new players and programs like Cardio Tennis available, this little bit of news makes me want to buy a racket and join the likes of super FBGs Serena and Venus.

Go love tennis.


Grocery Gotchas

With April Fool’s Day coming up tomorrow, be aware of labels that may be fooling you. A special report from Consumer Reports Health cautions buyers that they should think twice when reading package labels that sound like health claims. The claim “all natural” is one such confusing label. Consumer Reports gives the example of Snapple Tea, which carries “all natural” on its bottle despite listing high-fructose corn syrup on its ingredient list. Remember, the FDA doesn’t officially define the term natural.

Read the fine print.

Run Right

Think all the miles you’re logging might make your joints creak later? Have no fear! A recent study that looked at healthy aging runners found that running didn’t damage joints or leave runners less able to exercise. Researchers are saying that if you’re healthy and generally free of injury, there’s no need to pack away those running shoes, and moderate running can actually help joint function. But remember, to keep those joints free from squeaks, you need to maintain their health, which means taking a break if you’re in pain.

Keep on keepin’ on.

Erin
Photos grabbed from szlea, NatalieMaynor, and Seamus Murray on Flickr.



Comments

  1. Lori says

    Love the running study! I had read something similar to that recently as well. Definitely good news.

    I think the answer with the labels is to reduce foods that have labels then we won’t need to bother with reading them. Last time I checked those good old fruits and veggies had no package for confusion. :)

  2. Jody - fit at 51 says

    Love the running article. As a jogger, I had heard this. I follow the rule of listening to my body & if I need to cut back, make changes or whatever based on how the bod feels, I do it. It is all about that so you don't injure yourself.

    As for the misleading labels, I don't even want to go there. Ridiculous!

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