Do You Set Goals?

Credit: shuttermonkey

Credit: shuttermonkey

On Monday, we shared some tips for setting “SMART” goals—those that are specific, measurable, attainable, realistic and timely. Once you learn what’s a good goal versus a not-so-great goal, it’s easy to see why SMART goals are, well, smart. To get where you want to go, you need a plan and an end-point. Right? Tell us below if you consider yourself a goal-setter when it comes to working out and eating right!

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Tell us about the goals you are—or are not—working on in the comments below! —Jenn



Comments

  1. She-Fit says

    My goal is to exercise daily and stay active. With the summer in full swing I get so lazy and end up on the couch all day!

  2. Arena Fitness says

    I think goals can be very effective, but I think you set yourself up for success when they are focused on controllable events. In other words, setting weight and/or body fat goals, which tend to be the most common ones (at least for clients at my gym), may be self-defeating. If, however, you focus on setting goals that are BEHAVIORAL in nature, and thereby controllable, you set yourself up for a greater likelihood of success.

    For instance, instead of saying you want to lose x pounds, focus on actions like making sure you get x number of workouts per week or set the goal of clean eating and charting that eating every day. That way you're not relying on physiological events that may not be controllable. Hopefully, then, as you achieve these action-oriented results you will also achieve, as a byproduct, weight and body fat changes, if they are warranted.

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