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The Hunger Fullness Scale That Will Change Your Life

Are you hungry? Are you full? These are pretty simple questions.
OR ARE THEY?!
I, for one, have had my own past struggles with listening to my true hunger and fullness levels — and actually honoring them enough to let them lead my food decisions. But, let me tell you, once you connect to your body and actually listen to what it’s telling you, you will feel so much better. And, you might just be surprised on some days how little food it takes to satisfy a craving or fill you up — or, on other days, just how truly hungry you really are!
We all eat for so many other reasons than hunger. We eat because we’re bored, lonely, celebrating, others are eating — and sometimes just because the clock tells us to, or our crazy great aunt is pressuring us to try another slice of pie. It happens.
But if you can commit to using the below hunger and fullness scale most of the time — and really making it a mindful practice of self love and self respect — guys, I know it’s sounds hippity dippity, but your fit foodie soul will open up! (And that whole “everything in moderation” thing because so much easier to do on the daily.)
hunger-fullness-scale-585
Will you give the hunger and fullness scale a try? Tell me how it goes! Whenever I notice myself struggling with mindless eating or overeating, I always come back to this. Works every time. Jenn


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2 Comments
  1. Samantha says:

    This is assuming lot. Including but not limited to the speed at which one eats and that their brain registers hunger or fullness in a ‘normal’ manner.

    1. Jenn says:

      So true, Samantha! But, we’ve found that the practice increases mindfulness, and over time, can really help you to slow down and really enjoy and savor your food. It certainly can’t hurt. 😉
      —Jenn